WHAT IS WEB ACCESSIBILITY?

Website Accessibility is the effort to make websites easy for people with disabilities to use them. An example of a web accessibility feature is making sure your content is formatted in a way that a screenreader (device used for the visually impaired) can traverse through and read out-loud the content in a logical and understandable way. Another example is to have alternative text for images describing what the images are. The list of what makes a website accessible varies based on different guidelines out there.

WHY SHOULD THIS MATTER TO YOU?

  1. It’s the right thing to do.
  2. ADA Lawsuits against dealers are on the rise.

“Dealerships are being swept up in litigation against businesses brought by disabled plaintiffs in several states. Seyfarth, a law firm that tracks ADA-related litigation, projects more than 2,400 federal website lawsuits will be filed in 2019, more than in each of the previous two years. Many of the cases end with financial settlements and commitments to improve accessibility online.”

Our advice to our clients is to promptly embark on this accessibility journey right away, because these lawsuits are not going away,” said Minh Vu, a partner at Seyfarth in Washington, D.C. “And it’s very important for people with disabilities” to access websites.

Several experts told Automotive News the cases have prompted dealerships to update their digital accessibility practices, something recommended even for dealerships that haven’t been sued. The legal actions hitting dealers involve both lawsuits and informal demands.

Many retailers first receive demand letters from plaintiffs’ lawyers before a lawsuit is filed, and some companies settle in response to those letters without waiting for the matter to progress to a lawsuit.

Because those settlements happen out of court, there’s no way to know how many such settlements are happening and what the terms are, said Randy Henrick, principal at dealership compliance firm Randy Henrick & Associates LLC.

It’s a dilemma for dealers. While courts have held that business websites are subject to the ADA, the federal government has not adopted compliance regulations. That makes it hard to determine how much to spend on compliance, experts said.” – Autonews.com

 

WHERE CAN I FIND MORE INFORMATION?

WCAG 2 (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines) is by far the most common set of guidelines and it is fairly exhaustive. There are different levels that can be obtained: A, AA or AAA (AAA being the most stringent).

NADA released a FAQ that answers dealers most commonly asked questions.

 

HOW DO I CHECK MY WEBSITE ACCESSIBILITY?

Email us at info@buzznerd.com or call us at 1-877-210-1457. We will perform an audit at no cost to you and send you a report.

 

HOW CAN BUZZNERD TRUCKS HELP?